Bi and Lesbian Books Out This Week! (March 31st)

Look by Zan Romanoff cover and blurb Music from Another World by Robin Talley cover and blurb The Sisters Grimm by Menna van Praag cover and blurb The Worst of All Possible Words by Alex White cover and blurb The Devil's Blade by Mark Alder Crocuses Hatch from Snow by Jamie Burnet cover and blurb Hex by Rebecca Dinerstein Knight cover and blurb Heavy Vinyl: Y2K-O!, Vol. 2 cover and blurb Wow, No Thank You.: Essays by Samantha Irby cover and blurb No Modernism Without Lesbians by Diana Souhami My Art is Killing Me and Other Poems by Amber Dawn cover and blurb

Bi and Lesbian Books Out This Week! (March 31st)

Check out more LGBTQ new releases at:

Support the Lesbrary on Patreon to get queer books in the mail throughout the year!

Coming Out Later In Life: Books About Coming Out as Bi or Lesbian at 30+

Coming Out Later in Life cover collage

Coming Out Later In Life: Books About Coming Out as Bi or Lesbian at 30+

Covers

Romance:

 

Other:

image

Memoirs:

Vote for your favourites and add your own to the Goodread list!

Support the Lesbrary on Patreon to get queer books in the mail throughout the year!

Bi & Lesbian Books Out This Week

New Sapphic Books Out This Week! Save Yourself by Cameron Esposito

New Bi and Lesbian Books Out This Week!

It’s Tuesday, and that’s new book day! Here are some of the sapphic books coming out this week.ne

Check out more LGBTQ new releases at: 

Support the Lesbrary on Patreon to get queer books in the mail throughout the year!

Browse Bi & Lesbian Bisexual Books at the Lesbrary Amazon Shop!

Browse Bi & Lesbian Bisexual Books at the Lesbrary Amazon Shop!

In case you missed it, the Lesbrary has a Recommendations Page that has all my (Danika’s) top picks for bi and lesbian books! They are listed by genre, and are linked to their full review. It has grown and grown over the years, though, and now it’s a pretty intimidating list to scroll through. Now, though, the Lesbrary has an Amazon Page! All of the books on the Recommendation Page are now on the Amazon Page.

If you buy anything through the Amazon Page, I get a small percentage, which helps keep the Lesbrary running. It also will be deleted if it’s inactive for 2 months, so if you find it useful, consider clicking through.

Check out the Lesbrary’s Amazon Page here!

New Bi & Lesbian Books Out Today!

New Sapphic Books Out this week!

Goldie Vance: The Hotel Whodunit by Lilliam Rivera

The Degenerates by J. Albert Mann The Queerleaders by M B Guel Super Adjacent by Crystal Cestari The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo Don’t You Know I Love You by Laura Bogart The Queer Games Avant-Garde by Bonnie Ruberg

New Bi and Lesbian Books Out This Week!

Check out more LGBTQ new releases at: 

Lesbrary Patreon Giveaway!

Lesbrary Patreon Giveaway image

Another month, another book given away on the Lesbrary Patreon! Pictured above are just a few of the books available to choose from this month.

The Lesbrary and Bi and Lesbian Literature have a Patreon page, and every month patrons who pledge $2 or more a month are entered to win a free queer women book! (No, you don’t pay for shipping, and yes, it’s open internationally!)

(Technically, the giveaway happens on the “exclusive email list” which you get added to once you pledge $2 or more on Patreon.)

In addition to the giveaway, every $5 patron gets a guaranteed sapphic book in the mail twice a year! $10 patrons get books 4x a year, and $25 patrons get books every month!

There are lots of other perks too, including access to the Lesbrary Discord channel and handwritten postcards from me every month.

Support the Lesbrary Patreon page here and be entered in the giveaway!

Stack of books available through the Lesbrary Patreon giveaway

Only 3 Days Left in the Lesbrary Patreon Special Offer!

In case you missed it, the Lesbrary recently turned 10! To celebrate, I’ve overhauled the Lesbrary Patreon page, and for the next 3 days, every new Patron at the $5 and up level gets a handwritten thank you card in the mail!

Why join the Lesbrary Patreon? Well, you can help keep this place afloat, and I’d sure appreciate that! But there are lots of other benefits, including:

Rainbow Reader tier

For $5 a month, you get:

  • A behind-the-scenes look at the Lesbrary
  • Entered in a monthly queer book giveaway!
  • Access to the Lesbrary Discord, where you can chat with the Lesbrary reviewers and other sapphic book fans!
  • Every month, you vote on a book you’d like me to read, and I do a Patreon-only reading vlog where I record all my thoughts about it!
  • In addition to the monthly giveaway, you get a guaranteed queer book in the mail twice a year!

Honorary Lesbrarian tier

For $25 a month, in addition to access to the Discord channel and monthly Patreon-only reading vlogs, you get a queer book in the mail EVERY MONTH!

Check out the Patreon for more information!

It’s the Lesbrary’s 10th Birthday!!

The Lesbrary is 10 years old! graphic

It’s mind-boggling to say, but it’s been 10 years today since the very first Lesbrary post was published. A decade! That’s ancient in internet time! I’m so proud of how this little blog has grown over the years. When it started, there were very few queer book blogs out there. There were a handful of “LGBT” and “Gay and Lesbian” book blogs, but in reality, they were 90% m/m books. Now, there are so many other excellent queer book blogs out there! Not only that, but there are exponentially more queer books being published every year. It’s so much more than I could have imagined when I started the Lesbrary!

To celebrate the Lesbrary’s first decade, I’ve overhauled the Lesbrary Patreon page. To celebrate the Lesbrary’s birthday, for the next week, every new Patron at the $5 and up level gets a handwritten thank you card in the mail! Why join the Lesbrary Patreon? Well, you can help keep this place afloat, and I’d sure appreciate that! But there are lots of other benefits:

Bookworm tier

For $2 a month, you get a behind-the-scenes look at the Lesbrary, and you get entered to win a queer book/ARC every month! More info at this page.

Rainbow Reader tier

For $5 a month, you get all the previous benefits, PLUS:

  • Access to the Lesbrary Discord, where you can chat with the Lesbrary reviewers and other sapphic book fans!
  • Every month, you vote on a book you’d like me to read, and I do a Patreon-only reading vlog where I record all my thoughts about it!
  • In addition to the monthly giveaway, you get a guaranteed queer book in the mail twice a year!

Book Dragon tierFor $10a month, you get all the previous benefits, PLUS:

  • A guaranteed queer book in the mail four times a year instead of twice!
  • A handwritten postcard from me every month!

 

Honorary Lesbrarian tier

For $25 a month, in addition to access to the Discord channel and monthly Patreon-only reading vlogs, you get a queer book in the mail EVERY MONTH!

Lesbrary Director tier

For $50 a month, you choose a book-related topic for me to make a video about, where I’ll also thank you by name and shout out your social media or book. This can be a video or Lesbrary post: whichever you’d prefer!

On top of that, if we are able to reach the $500 a month goal, I’ll be able to take the Lesbian Literature 101 project from research into action, by making monthly videos. For years, I’ve been slowly researching and working on a project called Lesbian Literature 101. I want to outline the history of queer women books in an accessible way, because I have found that this history is often erased and hidden. I love this project, but it is very time-consuming, so I haven’t been able to move beyond the research stage yet. If we can reach $500 a month, though, I will be able to carve out time to start making monthly Lesbian Literature 101 videos!

Whether you’re a Patron or regular reader, thank you so much for your support of the Lesbrary! It wouldn’t still be here if it wasn’t for you. Here’s to another 10 years! I can’t wait to see what the future of queer lit and the Lesbrary looks like.

Check out the Lesbrary Patreon here!

If you’re not able to monetarily support the Lesbrary right now, consider sharing this link around! I would sure appreciate it.

Bi & Lesbian Books Out This Week

Sapphic Books Out This Week graphic

It’s Tuesday, and that means new book day! Here are some of the sapphic books coming out today.

Ink in the Blood by Kim SmejkalInk in the Blood by Kim Smejkal (YA Fantasy)

A lush, dark YA fantasy debut that weaves together tattoo magic, faith, and eccentric theater in a world where lies are currency and ink is a weapon, perfect for fans of Leigh Bardugo and Kendare Blake.

Celia Sand and her best friend, Anya Burtoni, are inklings for the esteemed religion of Profeta. Using magic, they tattoo followers with beautiful images that represent the Divine’s will and guide the actions of the recipients. It’s considered a noble calling, but ten years into their servitude Celia and Anya know the truth: Profeta is built on lies, the tattooed orders strip away freedom, and the revered temple is actually a brutal, torturous prison.

Their opportunity to escape arrives with the Rabble Mob, a traveling theater troupe. Using their inkling abilities for performance instead of propaganda, Celia and Anya are content for the first time . . . until they realize who followed them. The Divine they never believed in is very real, very angry, and determined to use Celia, Anya, and the Rabble Mob’s now-infamous stage to spread her deceitful influence even further.

To protect their new family from the wrath of a malicious deity and the zealots who work in her name, Celia and Anya must unmask the biggest lie of all—Profeta itself.

[bisexual main character; gay, lesbian, and non-binary side characters]

The Unspoken Name by AK LarkwoodThe Unspoken Name by AK Larkwood (Fantasy)

What if you knew how and when you will die?

Csorwe does — she will climb the mountain, enter the Shrine of the Unspoken, and gain the most honored title: sacrifice.

But on the day of her foretold death, a powerful mage offers her a new fate. Leave with him, and live. Turn away from her destiny and her god to become a thief, a spy, an assassin—the wizard’s loyal sword. Topple an empire, and help him reclaim his seat of power.

But Csorwe will soon learn – gods remember, and if you live long enough, all debts come due.

[f/f romance; sapphic main character; lesbian, bisexual, and gay characters]

Stormsong by CL Polk (Fantasy)

After spinning an enthralling world in Witchmark, praised as a “can’t-miss debut” by Booklist, and as “thoroughly charming and deftly paced” by the New York Times, C. L. Polk continues the story in Stormsong. Magical cabals, otherworldly avengers, and impossible love affairs conspire to create a book that refuses to be put down.

Dame Grace Hensley helped her brother Miles undo the atrocity that stained her nation, but now she has to deal with the consequences. With the power out in the dead of winter and an uncontrollable sequence of winter storms on the horizon, Aeland faces disaster. Grace has the vision to guide her parents to safety, but a hostile queen and a ring of rogue mages stand in the way of her plans. There’s revolution in the air, and any spark could light the powder. What’s worse, upstart photojournalist Avia Jessup draws ever closer to secrets that could topple the nation, and closer to Grace’s heart.

Can Aeland be saved without bloodshed? Or will Kingston die in flames, and Grace along with it?

[f/f romance]

Ceremonials by Katharine ColdironCeremonials by Katharine Coldiron (Fiction)

Ceremonials is a twelve-part lyric novella inspired by Florence + the Machine’s 2011 album of the same name. It’s the story of two girls, Amelia and Corisande, who fall in love at a boarding school. Corisande dies suddenly on the eve of graduation, but Amelia cannot shake her ghost. A narrative about obsession, the Minotaur, and the veil between life and death, Ceremonials is a poem in prose, a keening in words, and a song etched in ink.

[f/f romance]

The Mercies by Kiran Millwood HargraveThe Mercies by Kiran Millwood Hargrave (Historical Fiction)

After a storm has killed off all the island’s men, two women in a 1600s Norwegian coastal village struggle to survive against both natural forces and the men who have been sent to rid the community of alleged witchcraft.

Finnmark, Norway, 1617. Twenty-year-old Maren Bergensdatter stands on the craggy coast, watching the sea break into a sudden and reckless storm. Forty fishermen, including her brother and father, are drowned and left broken on the rocks below. With the menfolk wiped out, the women of the tiny Northern town of Vardø must fend for themselves.

Three years later, a sinister figure arrives. Absalom Cornet comes from Scotland, where he burned witches in the northern isles. He brings with him his young Norwegian wife, Ursa, who is both heady with her husband’s authority and terrified by it. In Vardø, and in Maren, Ursa sees something she has never seen before: independent women. But Absalom sees only a place untouched by God and flooded with a mighty evil.

As Maren and Ursa are pushed together and are drawn to one another in ways that surprise them both, the island begins to close in on them with Absalom’s iron rule threatening Vardø’s very existence.

Inspired by the real events of the Vardø storm and the 1620 witch trials, The Mercies is a feminist story of love, evil, and obsession, set at the edge of civilization.

[f/f romance]

The Sacramento of Desire by Julia Bloch (Poetry)

THE SACRAMENTO OF DESIRE links the vulnerabilities of the body with the economies of assisted reproduction, landscape disasters, and language itself. Julia Bloch’s poems catalog temporal objects–lunar charts, basal calendars, office cubicles, freeway metering–to imagine the possibilities of a queer future beyond the edges of ruin. In interlocking, essayistic prose poetry, Bloch’s third full-length collection mimics the way time skips and lingers in feeling, questioning the norms of reproduction we attach to mandates for social value.

[queer]

Citrus+ Vol. 1 by SaburoutaCitrus+ Vol. 1 by Saburouta (Manga)

A NEW SEASON OF LOVE!

High schoolers (and stepsisters) Yuzu and Mei have gone public with their relationship! The two are happy to be dating out in the open, but friends and family keep trying to butt in with advice. Can Yuzu and Mei figure things out on their own? The return of the modern yuri classic!

[f/f romance]

 

Kase-san and Yamada Vol. 1 by Hiromi TakashimaKase-san and Yamada Vol. 1 by Hiromi Takashima (Manga)

KASE-SAN AND YAMADA GO TO COLLEGE!

Yamada is in heaven at her school’s horticulture department, and Kase-san is training hard at the sports university. With classes and a long train ride to keep them apart, hanging out together is tough. Can they beat their busy schedules and find time for one another?

[f/f romance]

Our Wonderful Days Vol. 2 by Kei HamuroOur Wonderful Days Vol. 2 by Kei Hamuro (Manga)

LIVING SIDE-BY-SIDE WITH THE ONE I LOVE

High schoolers Nanaya and Minori are classmates, best friends, and roommates. Though the two are as different as night and day, they do just about everything together! But what drew them together in the first place? Find out in the second volume of the sweet slice-of-life yuri series, Our Wonderful Days!

[f/f romance]

Check out more LGBTQ new releases at:

If you like what we do here, consider supporting the Lesbrary on Patreon! At $2 or more a month, you’re entered to win a queer women book every month! You can also check out the Lesbrary Amazon page for lists of all the sapphic books I recommend.

Black Bi & Lesbian Book Recommendations for Black History Month and F/F February

February is Black History Month, and I thought I’d use this time to promote some black lesbian books! (And black bisexual books, black sapphic books, black queer books, etc.) Black lesbian fiction is one of the keywords that leads a lot of people to the Lesbrary, and I can see why. A quick Google search doesn’t bring up a lot of helpful posts. The Black Lesbian Literary Collective is a fantastic resource, though, and I highly recommend checking it out.

To help add to your Black History Month TBR, here are 15 black bi and lesbian books that I love. Most are by black authors and feature black characters, but there might be a few that are just one or the other. Let me know in the comments what your favourite black lesbian fiction is, or any other black queer books you recommend!

I’m going to start out with 15 black sapphic books that I have read and loved, and then I’ll share some of the top ones on my TBR. I talked about them in my latest Book Riot video, or you can scroll down if you’d rather read my thoughts on each!

Fiction:

The Color Purple by Alice WalkerThe Color Purple by Alice Walker

This is a classic for a reason. It does have brutal subject matter, including rape and racism, but it somehow manages to have an overall message of hope and resilience. My favourite part about this book was the huge cast of diverse, complex female characters that all form a network of support with each other, finding connections across difference.

Speaking of relationships between women, the description of this book often downplays the queer content. Celie is proudly gay. She has romantic and sexual relationships with women in this book. It’s not subtext: it’s a major part of the plot.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

The Summer We Got Free by Mia MckenzieThe Summer We Got Free by Mia Mckenzie

The overwhelming image I get when trying to describe The Summer We Got Free is the moments just before a summer thunderstorm: the charged anticipation, the humid heat, the claustrophobia of it. This is about a family and a house haunted by its past. In an alternating structure, we learn about Ava as a vibrant, unrestrainable child, and the closed-off and dulled person she is now. Slowly, we build up to the event that caused this shift. This is a brilliant and affecting book that should be recognized as a classic of black lesbian fiction and of literary fiction in general.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

YA and Middle Grade:

This Is What It Feels Like by Rebecca BarrowThis is What it Feels Like by Rebecca Barrow

Who can resist a literal getting the band back together book? Dia, Jules, and Hanna used to be inseparable. But the band and friendship fell apart when a) Dia’s boyfriend died b) Dia discovered soon after that she was pregnant and c) Hanna’s alcoholism landed her in the hospital. Dia cuts ties with Hanna, and Jules sides with her. Now, Hanna is sober, Dia is a mom of a toddler, and there’s a Battle of the Bands that could change all of their lives, if they can mend their friendship. These are multifaceted people with complex relationships with each other. There’s also a cute F/F romance (with Jules)!

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Little and Lion by Brandy ColbertLittle & Lion by Brandy Colbert

A quiet, thoughtful book that deftly handles subjects like race, sexuality, and mental health. Suzette is black, bisexual, and Jewish, and those aspects of her identity all interact and affect her everyday life. I liked how it addressed the challenges of coming out even in a fairly positive environment: the embarrassment in having to announce this intimate part of yourself, the tension in seeing what people’s reactions will be, the irritation of having it involuntarily become your defining feature, the general awkwardness. But this story isn’t about Suzette’s sexual identity. It’s about her relationship with her brother, and how they’ve recently grown apart, to her dismay. Lionel has recently been diagnosed as bipolar, and shortly after that, Suzette was sent away to boarding school. They haven’t seen each other a lot, and they aren’t sure how to go back to the closeness they once shared. It’s painful. This is a beautiful book with a lot of depth.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

The Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda PetrusThe Stars and the Blackness Between Them by Junauda Petrus

It’s the classic story: girl meets granddaughter of pastor, girls falls in love, girls get caught and sent away to separate countries. That is only the beginning, though.

This is a book with a strong voice and focus. I appreciate that this isn’t written to pander to a white American audience–it trusts that readers will ether understand or accept being a little lost. It makes for an immersive, powerful read.

I really appreciated the skill at work here. Audre and Mabel are well-rounded characters, and I loved their relationship. Mabel pushes away the people in her life when she becomes seriously ill, and they also don’t know how to be around her. Audre is determined to keep their friendship, and she continues to show up for Mabel. They develop a stronger relationship through this. Audre is also still dealing with the rejection from her mother, and slowly becoming closer to the father that she has spent very little time with in her life.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

The House You Pass On the Way by Jacqueline WoodsonThe House You Pass on the Way by Jacqueline Woodson

This is a tiny (99 pages) book with a lot of layers. It’s the story of the summer when Staggerlee was fourteen, and when she felt confused and alone. It’s also the summer when she met her (estranged, adopted) cousin Trout. It’s atmospheric and emotional. Staggerlee is struggling with being small-town famous for her grandparents dying in an anti-civil rights bombing. She feels set apart for being mixed race, and is also questioning her sexuality. She is able to process a lot of this with Trout, finding ease in not yet having the answer. “Staggerlee and Trout were here today. Maybe they will and maybe they won’t be gay.” This is a slow, thoughtful read.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Hurricane Child by Kacen Callender coverHurricane Child by Kacen Callender

A middle grade novel with a lot of complexity. It’s set on the US Virgin Islands, and Caroline is struggling with a lot: she is ostracized at school, her mother has gone missing, and as she begins to develop feelings for a new girl at school, she is met with waves of homophobia. This is a difficult and sometimes surreal book–Caroline sees spirits. This is a messy story, not in writing skill, but because it realistically depicts this overwhelming and confusing point in Caroline’s life.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Goldie Vance Volume 1Goldie Vance series by Hope Larson (Author) and Brittney Williams (illustrator)

This is an all-ages comic with a black teenage girl detective! The plot is a little more serious/political than I’d expect with something like Lumberjanes, but this is still a lot of fun.

Of course, what really made me love this is the queer content. Goldie meets Diane and is immediately enamored with this girl rocking the James Dean look. Their romance is adorable, and I look forward to seeing more of them.

(Note: Brittney Williams is the co-creator, and she does the illustrations in this first volume, but isn’t involved in the subsequent volumes.)

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Science Fiction & Fantasy:

Ascension by Jacqueline Koyanagi coverAscension by Jacqueline Koyanagi

Alana is a black lesbian spaceship mechanic with a chronic illness, who ends up in a found family polyamorous relationship. What’s not to like?

The strength of this book is the fully realized characters, who all have intricate relationships with each other. The romance is a subplot here, and although I really liked it, it’s no more important than Alana’s complicated and frustrating relationship with her sister.

I am really hoping that Jacqueline Koyanagi continues this series, because I’m invested–in the characters, in the world, and in the plot. This works well as a standalone, but I want more.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

The Salt Roads by Nalo HopkinsonThe Salt Roads by Nalo Hopkinson

This is historical fiction following three black women in different places and times (18th century Haiti, 19th century Paris, and 4th century Egypt). All three are sometimes possessed by Elizi, a spirit.

The Salt Roads is a hugely ambitious book exploring racism throughout time, and how these women survive and fight back. It is also incredibly queer. I was assigned this in a university class, and I was pleasantly surprised to find 2 lesbian sex scenes within the first 15 pages.

This is a stunning book that made me a lifelong Nalo Hopkinson fan.

Skip my review and check out Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian’s.

Falling in Love With Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson coverFalling in Love with Hominids by Nalo Hopkinson

Did I mention being a lifelong Hopkinson fan? I’ll admit that this collection only has one sapphic story, but it is the longest story in the collection, and there are other queer stories. I was hooked  from the first sentence: I didn’t used to like people much.

“Ours Is the Prettiest” is part of the Borderlands series, which is a series of books and stories where authors share the same characters and settings. I thought this worked really well as a stand-alone. I can’t say how well it fits into the established world–in the introduction Hopkinson mentions getting complaints that her more diverse take was criticized by some readers–but I am definitely inclined to side with this story, which felt like it had more world-building informing it than even made it into the text.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Everfair by Nisi ShawlEverfair by Nisi Shawl

This is a steampunk alternate history of the Belgian Congo. It is a brilliant, dense, thought-provoking story about colonialism told from a huge variety of perspectives. This means that you get to see the story from so many angles: the well-meaning white supporters of Everfair, the existing king and queen of the region trying to regain control, the Chinese workers brought in by the Belgium king, mixed-race European Everfair inhabitants, etc.

The story spans decades, tackling politics, war, espionage, grief, love and betrayal. There are three queer women point of view characters, and the complicated, deeply flawed, compelling relationship between two of them is at the heart of this story.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

The Gilda Stories by Jewelle GomezThe Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomez

This follows a vampire from just before her change, when she is escaping from slavery, to two centuries afterwards (yes, to 2050). It is almost like a collection of short stories, each set a decade or two after the previous one. It really imagines the scope of being immortal. It also is just as much a history of racism and slavery in the United States.

I also loved how Gomez incorporated vampire mythology (about running water and connection to the earth) as well as developing a vampire moral code: Vampires are able to manipulate people’s thoughts, reading what a person needs (comfort, decisiveness, hope, etc), and leaving that with them. They also heal the wounds they cause, making it, in their opinion, an even exchange.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Better Off Red by Rebekah WeatherspoonBetter Off Red by Rebekah Weatherspoon

Another lesbian vampire book, but with a very different tone. This is an erotica (vampire sorority sisters!) I did have some issues with the plot, but overall this is a really fun, sexy story that manages to convincingly have vampires with consensual relationships.

Despite the vampire orgies, this ends up having compelling characters. I look forward to reading the next books in the series, especially because focuses on my favourite supporting character, Cleo.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Nonfiction:

Hunger by Roxane GayHunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

Hunger follows Roxane Gay’s journey with her body, from when she was a kid to her present day, and how the trauma in her life has played out over her body. It talks frankly about her rape as a child and how she has lived with that experience for the rest of her life. It talks about the way our society views fat bodies, how that fatphobia affects her in so many ways. It talks about her disordered eating, the unhealthy relationships she’s had (as well as the healthy ones).

Despite the subject matter, Gay writes in approachable style that feels like she’s having a conversation with you, making this easier to read than I was expecting. She also discussed coming out as bi, and some of her relationships with women. This is dark, sometimes brutal book, but it’s also a masterful one.

Check out my full Lesbrary review.

Of course, this only scratches the surface! Here are a few more on my TBR pile:

In Another Place, Not Here by Dionne Brand  The Heart Does Not Bend by Makeda Silvera  Jam on the Vine by LaShonda Barnett  Coffee Will Make You Black by April Sinclair  Don't Explain by Jewelle Gomez

Once Ghosted, Twice Shy by Alyssa Cole  Treasure by Rebekah Weatherspoon    Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron  You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson

The Other Side of Paradise by Staceyann Chin  Homegirls: A Black Feminist Anthology edited by Barbara Smith    The Complete Works of Pat Parker    Head Off & Split by Nikky Finney

If you like what we do here at the Lesbrary, consider supporting the Lesbrary on Patreon! At $2 or more a month, you’re entered to win a queer women book every month! You can also check out the Lesbrary Amazon page for lists of all the sapphic books I recommend.